The Blind Watchmaker

The Blind Watchmaker
Richard Dawkins

The first line of a book I wish to write is "It is almost impossible to overstate how much we live an evolutionary existence".

Given such pretensions, I thought reading this classic by Richard Dawkins was a good idea.

It showed me whilst at once I had a very good idea of how evolution works, the complexities of it and the examples really do boggle and edify the mind.

Some of the interesting parts I had no idea about where the scientific ideas of other ways evolution could happen other than Darwin's ideas of natural selection.  Perhaps reading Dawkin's account of them isn't the best way to approach them, but I was left very convinced by what he said.

The parts on convergent evolution were fascinating as well, how so many species will come up with their own similar answer to sight, flight etc. 

It was also whilst reading this, and thinking about Hegel's dialectic, that I started to look at ideas in evolutionary terms.  That we should be unafraid of change, adaption, the winnowing of false ideas and the emergence of new ones.  This gets harder to do as you are older, but I hope to always be in a state of intellectual becoming.

We live in a beautiful, amazing, mysterious world, and reading about evolution in books like this only enhances my sense of that.